Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Scheme bilked grandparents of more than $1.5M | #scams | #elderlyscams – Active Lifestyle Media

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Elderly ScamsScheme bilked grandparents of more than $1.5M | #scams | #elderlyscams

Scheme bilked grandparents of more than $1.5M | #scams | #elderlyscams

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Investigators are calling a scheme preying on grandparents an awful case of elder abuse.A federal grand jury indicted three people for preying on grandparents’ love of their grandchildren and then stealing their retirement savings.Jonathan Lenzer, acting U.S. attorney for Maryland, said it was a heartless, well-organized and successful scheme.”These three defendants were part of a nationwide scheme that was both ruthless and well organized,” Lenzer said.Eghosasere Avboraye-Igbinedion, also known as “Ego” and “Ghost,” 26, of Miramar, Florida; Medard “Jay” Ulysse, 37, of Miami; and Amaya English, 21, of Baltimore, were indicted on a federal charge of conspiracy to commit mail fraud.Officials allege the defendants defrauded more than 70 older adults of more than $1.5 million from January 2018 through November 2019.”In general, members of the scheme called elderly victims on the phone and falsely told these victims that a loved one, typically a grandchild, was in a precarious situation, such as having been in a car accident or was arrested for a crime,” Lenzer said.In the phone calls, the defendants posed as police officers or lawyers and told the victims that their grandchildren needed thousands of dollars to for an urgent purpose, like bail money or legal fees, officials said. The defendants allegedly directed the victims to send thousands of dollars to a particular address using overnight delivery services.According to the indictment, Ulysse is accused of directing conspirators to travel from Florida to Maryland and other states and to identify residential locations across the country where the cash should be sent.According to the indictment, Avboraye-Ibginedion, English and other conspirators allegedly retrieved packages of cash from designated locations and relayed directions to other participants in the scheme about where and when to retrieve packages of cash.Prosecutors said the conspirators would then allegedly deliver the packages to Ulysse, English or to other conspirators. Ulysse is accused of distributing, and directing other conspirators to distribute, cash payments to other participants in the fraud scheme.”Victims across the country sent overnight packages filled with cash to vacant and abandoned properties all over the United States, including locations in Baltimore City,” said Jennifer Boone, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Baltimore field office.Some of the calls originated from Canada.”They’re very well-rehearsed. They know exactly what levers to pull, whether it was fear or concern. They’re very skilled,” said Keith Custer, supervisory special agent with the FBI.If convicted, the defendants each face a maximum sentence of 20 years in federal prison for mail fraud conspiracy.Two defendants previously charged as part of this ongoing investigation — David Green, 25, of Miami Gardens, Florida, and McArnold Charlemagne, 33, of Miramar, Florida — pleaded guilty to a federal mail fraud conspiracy charge, admitting that they defrauded more than 28 victims of more than $939,000. They are scheduled to be sentenced in October.Authorities said the investigation continues and that more people could be indicted.The Department of Justice has an interactive tool for older adults who have been financially exploited to help determine to which agency they should report their incident, and also a senior scam alert website.Victims are encouraged to file a complaint online with the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center or call 800-225-5324.Elder fraud complaints may be filed with the FTC online here or call 877-FTC-HELP (877-382-4357).

Investigators are calling a scheme preying on grandparents an awful case of elder abuse.

A federal grand jury indicted three people for preying on grandparents’ love of their grandchildren and then stealing their retirement savings.

Jonathan Lenzer, acting U.S. attorney for Maryland, said it was a heartless, well-organized and successful scheme.

“These three defendants were part of a nationwide scheme that was both ruthless and well organized,” Lenzer said.

Eghosasere Avboraye-Igbinedion, also known as “Ego” and “Ghost,” 26, of Miramar, Florida; Medard “Jay” Ulysse, 37, of Miami; and Amaya English, 21, of Baltimore, were indicted on a federal charge of conspiracy to commit mail fraud.

Officials allege the defendants defrauded more than 70 older adults of more than $1.5 million from January 2018 through November 2019.

“In general, members of the scheme called elderly victims on the phone and falsely told these victims that a loved one, typically a grandchild, was in a precarious situation, such as having been in a car accident or was arrested for a crime,” Lenzer said.

In the phone calls, the defendants posed as police officers or lawyers and told the victims that their grandchildren needed thousands of dollars to for an urgent purpose, like bail money or legal fees, officials said. The defendants allegedly directed the victims to send thousands of dollars to a particular address using overnight delivery services.

According to the indictment, Ulysse is accused of directing conspirators to travel from Florida to Maryland and other states and to identify residential locations across the country where the cash should be sent.

According to the indictment, Avboraye-Ibginedion, English and other conspirators allegedly retrieved packages of cash from designated locations and relayed directions to other participants in the scheme about where and when to retrieve packages of cash.

Prosecutors said the conspirators would then allegedly deliver the packages to Ulysse, English or to other conspirators. Ulysse is accused of distributing, and directing other conspirators to distribute, cash payments to other participants in the fraud scheme.

“Victims across the country sent overnight packages filled with cash to vacant and abandoned properties all over the United States, including locations in Baltimore City,” said Jennifer Boone, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Baltimore field office.

Some of the calls originated from Canada.

“They’re very well-rehearsed. They know exactly what levers to pull, whether it was fear or concern. They’re very skilled,” said Keith Custer, supervisory special agent with the FBI.

If convicted, the defendants each face a maximum sentence of 20 years in federal prison for mail fraud conspiracy.

Two defendants previously charged as part of this ongoing investigation — David Green, 25, of Miami Gardens, Florida, and McArnold Charlemagne, 33, of Miramar, Florida — pleaded guilty to a federal mail fraud conspiracy charge, admitting that they defrauded more than 28 victims of more than $939,000. They are scheduled to be sentenced in October.

Authorities said the investigation continues and that more people could be indicted.

The Department of Justice has an interactive tool for older adults who have been financially exploited to help determine to which agency they should report their incident, and also a senior scam alert website.

Victims are encouraged to file a complaint online with the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center or call 800-225-5324.

Elder fraud complaints may be filed with the FTC online here or call 877-FTC-HELP (877-382-4357).

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