Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility Police dog Cleo earns much-needed retirement, relaxing with now-former handler | Local | #retirement | #elderly | #seniors – Active Lifestyle Media

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Retirement NewsPolice dog Cleo earns much-needed retirement, relaxing with now-former handler | Local | #retirement | #elderly | #seniors

Police dog Cleo earns much-needed retirement, relaxing with now-former handler | Local | #retirement | #elderly | #seniors


“People would just come out and give up,” he said. “I would say some of those are the greatest (accomplishments) out there.”

Even outside of police work, Cleo has a presence that is positively magnetic.

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“We always love doing our demonstrations to the kids at all the schools; they love the dog,” Carlson said. “That kind of stuff we just eat right up.”

With her reputation backing her up, perhaps it’s no surprise that Cleo has consistently placed high during her annual certifications.






Deputy Adam Carlson, right, and police dog Cleo show off their first-place trophy awarded Feb. 9, 2020, at the U.S. Police Canine Association competition in Fargo, N.D. They are joined in the photo by Winona County Sheriff Ron Ganrude.




Back in early 2020, Carlson and Cleo took top honors in narcotics detection while attending the U.S. Police Canine Association in Fargo, North Dakota, after they beat out 38 other teams.

Just months before that in Nov. 2019, Carlson and Cleo, as part of a team that included officers from Houston, Austin and Douglas counties, placed first at the canine association’s National Patrol Dog Certification region team competition, beating out 90 other dog teams.

But now she no longer has to concern herself with certifications and proving just how competent she is. Now, instead, she gets to relax, all the while remaining with Carlson.

“Cleo is now going to become more of just a pet — she gets to relax (and) she gets to come and sleep in the house more often,” Carlson said. “When she was a working dog, we tried to keep her more in that working-dog mode, but now she gets to ride around in the side-by-side, be out in the yard more often and swim in the pool and things like that.”



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