Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility As California Stays Home Again, Volunteers Reach Out to Isolated Seniors – California Health Report | #elderly | #seniors | #execrise – Active Lifestyle Media

Follow or share

Active Lifestyle Media

Healthily LifestyleAs California Stays Home Again, Volunteers Reach Out to Isolated Seniors – California Health Report | #elderly | #seniors | #execrise

As California Stays Home Again, Volunteers Reach Out to Isolated Seniors – California Health Report | #elderly | #seniors | #execrise

[ad_1]

Volunteers from the Listos California Social Bridging Project talk on a group video call. Photo courtesy of Listos California.

The stories that volunteer John Lee of San Francisco hears each week as he makes calls to seniors across the state are often heartbreaking.

There was the 80-year-old Chinese woman in San Jose who’d been stuck at home for six months with no one visiting her; the elderly man who’d weathered two hospitalizations for COVID-19, alone; the senior who desperately wanted to see her grandkids but couldn’t because she was worried about catching the virus.                        

“Some are just by themselves,” said Lee, who volunteers for a state-sponsored program called the Listos California Social Bridging Project, which reaches out to seniors at risk for isolation. “Some of them feel pretty bad because they  … want to socialize, but they can’t.”

Social isolation and loneliness have long been a challenge among seniors. About one in six Californians over the age of 50 live alone, placing them at high risk for social isolation even before the pandemic. Now, physical distancing measures and fear of getting COVID-19 have exacerbated the problem. In survey results released in October by the AARP Foundation, over 60 percent of older adults reported experiencing social isolation since the pandemic began, and more than half said their anxiety levels had increased.

The holiday season is further adding to social isolation and feelings of loneliness for seniors, who are among those most at risk for serious illness and death from COVID-19. Many won’t be able to celebrate the holidays with loved ones because of virus concerns. Some have lost spouses or other family members to the virus, making the holidays particularly difficult.

“The amount of time that folks have been isolated is becoming quite unbearable,” said Karen Baker, who oversees the Social Bridging Project. “People are being given very clear directions —especially during this uptick — not to gather, and that is what we advise. It’s just that they need to be given other resources so that they can cope.” 

[ad_2]

Clink Here For The Original Source
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leave a Reply