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Health CareAP Photos: Vaccines offer hope amid new wave in Argentina | #healthcare | #elderly | #seniors

AP Photos: Vaccines offer hope amid new wave in Argentina | #healthcare | #elderly | #seniors

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Just over half of Argentine adults over 60 have been inoculated with at least one shot out of a total of 7.3 million. The country was one of the first in Latin America to start vaccination, but due to delays in the arrival of doses it now lags behind Chile, Brazil and Mexico. Argentina’s government blames the delays on geopolitical issues while the opposition blames them on an inability of President Alberto Fernández’s administration to negotiate with suppliers.

Corleto’s health is fragile after several surgeries for a fibroma and other ailments. “It was clear to me that if it (coronavirus) grabbed me, I had little hope.”

“For me, the vaccine is the end point, the light at the end of the road,” she said.

Corleto, who is divorced, spent the quarantine first imposed here in March 2020 in a two-room apartment in Burzaco, a western suburb of Buenos Aires.

It was difficult for the grandmother, who was accustomed to traveling and going out with her friends and grandchildren. She turned to reading, soap operas and virtual dance classes. She was also helped by faith. A regular at church every Sunday, she followed the Masses broadcast on the public channel.

She established a code with her neighbor: “If my window was closed at 10:30 in the morning, it meant something had happened to me.”

“The only thing I didn’t lose was hope,” she said.

Older adults with active social lives were particularly affected by pandemic isolation, with issues ranging from depression to impaired ambulatory ability.

“Isolation is a preventive measure that undoubtedly has its benefits and many harms. What we observe is that isolation led a loss of control of chronic diseases in the adult population,” said Julio Nemerovsky, president of the Argentine Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics. “It also led to a deterioration in mental health, especially in those elderly with an active family and social life. We have seen the appearance of depressive scenarios we didn’t see before.”

Gerontology experts warn there is a danger of false expectations that vaccines are completely effective and are calling for prevention measures to be maintained.

“Fortunately, (people who have been vaccinated) have a very high immunity, but it is not total. If I am in the 92% I am immunized, but if I am in the 8% I could still get COVID-19,” he said. “Of course, it will be less aggressive with a lower possibility of being lethal.”

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Associated Press writer Débora Rey contributed to this report.

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