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TV & MoviesA quarter of Minnesota seniors have gotten one shot of vaccine – Twin Cities | #television | #elderly | #movies

A quarter of Minnesota seniors have gotten one shot of vaccine – Twin Cities | #television | #elderly | #movies

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Minnesota has administered more than 732,000 doses of coronavirus vaccine and roughly a quarter of the state’s seniors have received at least one dose.

There are 569,164 Minnesotans statewide who have gotten at least their first shot and 162,132 who’ve received both, which is required for the best immune response. More than 233,000 of those vaccinated are 65 and older, about 25 percent of the state’s nearly 919,000 seniors.

Much of that is due to a federal and state effort to vaccinate the most vulnerable, many of whom reside in long-term care such as nursing homes, assisted living and rehabilitation facilities.

On Tuesday, Gov. Tim Walz visited Jones-Harrison Residence in Minneapolis to highlight the state’s work to inoculate those living and working in long-term care.

“This really is the first battle we are going to win in the war on COVID,” Walz said. State officials hope to have second doses for people in long-term care completed by the end of the month.

Last Friday, the facility finished administering second doses of vaccine to residents and staff. Annette Greely, CEO of the organization, said nearly 100 percent of residents and more than 60 percent of staff opted to be vaccinated.

PROGRESS ON VACCINES

Almost 1 million vaccine doses have been shipped to Minnesota health providers including about 187,500 sent to a federal program vaccinating residents and workers in long-term care with the help of pharmacy chains. The 788,925 doses sent to health care providers includes first and second doses.

Retail pharmacies, such as Thrifty White, Walgreens and Walmart, expect to receive some vaccine this week and have limited appointments available to seniors at about 40 locations statewide.

“Right now, we don’t have enough doses for everyone who wants one,” Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan said in a statement detailing how the state releases information about vaccine doses. “Until the federal government steps up and provides them, our providers need to quickly use the precious supply we have on hand.”

Jan Malcolm, Minnesota’s health commissioner, said federal officials said the state can expect another modest boost in vaccine allocation the following week. That would mean the state could receive roughly 90,000 doses a week by mid-February.


For more information on Minnesota’s coronavirus vaccine effort visit www.mn.gov/findmyvaccine or call 1-800-657-3504.


A LOOK AT THE NUMBERS

Minnesota reported six more COVID-19 deaths Tuesday, all people in their 80s and 90s, with five living in long-term care and one in a private home.

Another 586 infections were reported, the result of 10,623 tests. The state has now screened 6.8 million samples from 3.3 million residents since March 2020.

Of the 469,254 people who have tested positive for the coronavirus, 455,280 people, or 97 percent, have recovered enough they no longer need to be isolated.

The death toll has reached 6,308, with 3,977 of those fatalities, or 63 percent, residents of long-term care. Another 68 deaths are suspected to have been caused by COVID-19, but the person never had a positive coronavirus test.

There are 321 people hospitalized including 74 in critical condition. Hospitalizations, deaths and new case rates have declined dramatically since Minnesota’s late fall surge.

Health officials say the recent outbreak metrics are promising, but are cautiously watching how new variants of the coronavirus spread around the nation. Some of those variants have proved more contagious and deadly.

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