Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility 15 Lessons the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Taught Us | #television | #elderly | #movies – Active Lifestyle Media

Follow or share

TV & Movies15 Lessons the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Taught Us | #television | #elderly | #movies

15 Lessons the COVID-19 Pandemic Has Taught Us | #television | #elderly | #movies



Lesson 11: When Your World Gets Small, Nature Lets Us Live Large

“For older people in particular, nature provided a way to shake off the weight and hardships associated with stay-at-home orders, of social isolation and of the stress of being the most vulnerable population in the pandemic.”

Kathleen Wolf, a research social scientist in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington

One silver lining to COVID-19’s dark cloud: Clouds themselves became more familiar to all of us. So did birds, trees, bees, shooting stars and window gardens. Nearly 6 in 10 Americans have a new appreciation for nature because of the pandemic, according to one survey that also found three-quarters of respondents reported a boost in their mood while spending time outside.

By nearly every measure, the planet got more love during COVID. And wouldn’t it be nice if that continued going forward? The ins and outs on our new outdoor life:

Move somewhere greener (or at least move around more outside). How you access nature is up to you, but consider the options. Nearly a third of Americans were considering moving to less populated areas, according to a Harris Poll taken last year during the pandemic. Walking, running and hiking became national pastimes. One day last September, Boston’s BlueBikes bike-share system saw its highest-ever single-day ridership, with 14,400 trips recorded. Stargazers and bird-watchers helped push binocular sales up 22 percent.

Once known mainly as a retirement activity, pickleball has been the fastest-growing sport in America, with almost 3.5 million U.S. players of all ages participating in the contact-free outdoor net game designed for players of any athletic ability. The return of the pandemic “victory garden” reflects research that finds 79 percent of patients feel more relaxed and calm after spending time in a garden.

Make the city less gritty. The University of Washington’s Wolf thinks that our collective nature kick will go beyond a run on backyard petunias. Her research brief on the benefits of nearby nature in cities for older adults suggests we may rethink the design of neighborhood environments to facilitate older people’s outdoor activities. That means more places to sit, more green spaces associated with the health status of older people, safer routes and paths, and more allotment for community gardens. “It’s impossible to overestimate the value these outdoor spaces have on reducing stressful life events, improving working memory and adding meaning and happiness in older people’s lives,” Wolf says.

If you can’t get out, bring nature in. Even video and sounds of nature can provide health gains to those shut indoors, says Marc Berman of the University of Chicago’s Environmental Neuroscience Lab. “Listening to recordings of crickets chirping or waves crashing improved how our subjects performed on cognitive tests,” he says.

Above all, the environment is in your hands, so take action to protect it. “We’ve seen a lot of older folks stepping up their activity in trail conservation, stream cleaning, being forest guides and things like that this year, which indicates a shift in how that age group interacts with nature,” says Cornell University gerontologist Karl Pillemer.

“There’s an old saw that older people care less than younger people about the environment. But given this year’s nature boom, I’m expecting that to change. As the generation that gave birth to the environmental movement enters retirement, we’re likely to see a wave of interest in conservation among those 60 and up.”




Click Here For Original Source

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Leave a Reply